health care  
 
All about tendinitis causes of tendinitis symptoms of tendinitis diagnosis of tendinitis treatment for tendinitis achilles tendinitis patellar tendonitis tennis elbow shoulder tendonitis

What is the treatment for tendinitis?

The goal of treatment for tendinitis is to relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Rest or immobilization of the affected tendons is helpful for recovery. This may be achieved using a splint or a removable brace. The application of heat or cold to the affected area can help. Rest, ice, compression, and elevation (RICE) will treat the acute condition. The best way to apply ice

is in a bag with water. The water applies the cold directly to the skin. Chemical ice packs can get too cold and cause frostbite.

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs), such as aspirin or ibruprofen, can also reduce both pain and inflammation. Steroid injections into the tendon sheath can also be very useful in controlling pain and allowing physical therapy to start. Sometimes the inflammation lingers and requires additional treatment. Injections of cortisone-like medicine often relieve chronic tendonitis, but should be reserved for resistant cases since cortisone can occasionally cause problems of its own. Treatments may have to be repeated every 2 or 3 weeks for a month or two before the inflammation subsides completely. Chronic, persistent tendinitis, as may occur in rheumatoid arthritis, may have to be treated surgically to remove inflamed tissues, and physical therapy may be needed after surgery.

Physical therapy that stretches and strengthens the muscle and tendon is essential. This can restore the tendon's ability to function properly, improve healing, and prevent future injury. If tendinitis is persistent and unresponsive to nonsurgical treatment, a surgery to remove the afflicted portion of tendon can be performed. Surgery is also conducted to remove calcium buildup that comes with persistent tendinitis.

More information on tendinitis

What is tendinitis? - Tendinitis is inflammation, irritation, and swelling of a tendon, which is the fibrous structure that joins muscle to bone.
What causes tendinitis? - Tendinitis can occur as a result of injury, overuse, or with aging as the tendon loses elasticity. It can also be seen in systemic diseases.
What're the symptoms of tendinitis? - Tendinitis causes pain over the affected tendon. Tendonitis produces pain in the tissues surrounding a joint.
How is tendinitis diagnosed? - Careful pressure testing and movement of the parts is all that is necessary to identify the tendinitis. There are specific tests for specific tendons.
What is the treatment for tendinitis? - The goal of treatment for tendinitis is to relieve pain and reduce inflammation. Rest or immobilization of the affected tendons is helpful for recovery.
What is achilles tendinitis? - Achilles tendinitis is inflammation, irritation, and swelling of the Achilles tendon (the tendon that connects the muscles of the calf to the heel).
What is patellar tendonitis? - Patellar tendonitis (jumper's knee) is a condition characterized by inflammation of the patellar tendon, which connects the kneecap to shin bone.
What is tennis elbow? - Tennis elbow is an inflammation, soreness, or pain on the outside (lateral) side of the upper arm near the elbow.
What is shoulder tendonitis? - Shoulder tendonitis is an inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the tendons of the shoulder.
Bone, joint, & muscle disorders

Topics in bone, joint, and muscle disorders

Bone diseases
Bone tumors
Bone cancer
Muscle diseases
Spine (neck and back) disorders
Dupuytren's contracture
Costochondritis
Bunions
Plantar fasciitis
Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
Septic arthritis (infectious Arthritis)
Psoriatic arthritis
Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)
Ankylosing spondylitis
Gout (gouty arthritis)
Tendinitis
Osteoporosis
Whiplash
Fibromyalgia


All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005