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How is lordosis diagnosed?

Lordosis is diagnosed based on a history and physical exam. To diagnose lordosis, a doctor will take the patient's medical history and perform a physical examination. The medical history will cover such issues as when the excessive curve became noticeable, if it is getting worse and whether the amount of the curve seems to change. During the examination, the patient will be asked to bend forward and to the side to see whether the curve is flexible or fixed, how much range of motion the patient has and if the spine is aligned properly. The doctor may feel the spine, checking for abnormalities. The doctor may order a neurological assessment if the person is having pain, tingling, numbness, muscle spasms or weakness, sensations in his or her arms or legs or changes in bowel or bladder control. Other tests may be ordered, including X-rays of the spine as a whole and the lower back where the spine joins the pelvis.

More information on lordosis

What is lordosis? - Lordosis is an increased curvature of the normally curved lumbar spine. When the spine curves too far inward, the condition is called lordosis or swayback.
What causes lordosis? - Lordosis may be associated with poor posture, a congenital problem with the vertebrae, neuromuscular problems, back surgery, or a hip problem.
What're the symptoms of lordosis? - Symptoms of lordosis vary depending if lordosis occurs with other defects, including muscular dystrophy, developmental dysplasia of the hip.
How is lordosis diagnosed? - Lordosis is diagnosed based on a history and physical exam. Doctor will take the patient's medical history and perform a physical examination.
What's the treatment for lordosis? - The goal of treatment is to stop the progression of the curve and prevent deformity. Non-operative treatment may include bracing and physical therapy.
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