health care  
 
All about rheumatoid arthritis causes of rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis symptoms rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis treatment for rheumatoid arthritis rheumatoid arthritis medications rheumatoid arthritis diet juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) causes of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis diagnosis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis treatments for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis osteoarthritis causes of osteoarthritis risk factors for osteoarthritis complications of osteoarthritis symptoms of osteoarthritis diagnosing osteoarthritis osteoarthritis treatment osteoarthritis medications osteoarthritis cures with nutritional supplements osteoarthritis pain relief osteoarthritis exercise osteoarthritis prevention osteoarthritis of the hip arthritis types of arthritis causes of arthritis risk factors for arthritis signs and symptoms of arthritis diagnosis of arthritis arthritis treatments arthritis pain relief natural remedy to cure arthritis prevention of arthritis Arthritis Foundation septic arthritis (infectious arthritis) causes of septic arthritis (infectious arthritis) symptoms of septic arthritis diagnosis of infectious arthritis treatment for septic arthritis (infectious arthritis) psoriatic arthritis causes of psoriatic arthritis symptoms of psoriatic arthritis diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis treatment for psoriatic arthritis Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis) causes of Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis) symptoms of Reiter's syndrome diagnosis of Reiter's syndrome treatment for Reiter's syndrome ankylosing spondylitis causes of ankylosing spondylitis symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis diagnosing ankylosing spondylitis treatment for ankylosing spondylitis gout (gouty arthritis) causes of gout (gouty arthritis) risk factors for gout (gouty arthritis) complications of gout (gouty arthritis) symptoms of gout (gouty arthritis) diagnosis of gout treatment for gout (gouty arthritis) gout medications gout diet prevention of gout (gouty arthritis)
Nutrients are important in arthritis care! Arthritis is not a 'natural part of aging'. Over 100 forms are preventable and potentially curable. Providing the body with the correct nutrients to help this process is a significant step in the right direction in achieving this objective. Pharmaceutical medicines should be a last resort if you suffer from arthritis. This is because of their real and serious side effects. Arthrit-Eze from Xtend Life is a completely natural arthritis supplement and does not contain any pharmaceutical ingredients. It offers potential relief and rejuvenation for all forms of arthritis, safely, naturally and without side effects. You'll find ingredients in Arthrit-Eze that would be rare to find in another natural arthritis formula... mainly because of cost and difficulties of formulations. Some examples are SAMe, Cetyl Myristoleate, Celery Extract and Phellodendron Bark. Learn more about this natural arthritis formula...

What're the symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis?

Symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may appear during episodes (flare-ups) or may be chronic and continuous. Some flare-ups last only a few days; some last for months. The joints affected by juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have a membrane, called the synovial membrane, that produces synovial fluid to keep the joints lubricated and to help the bones move smoothly around the joint. When the synovial membrane becomes inflamed, it stiffens and thickens, making it difficult to

move the joint. This constant inflammation damages protective tissue that covers the end of a bone in the joint, called the cartilage. With time, the joint can become deformed, the cartilage can be destroyed, and the unprotected bone can begin to wear away. Because the child may avoid moving the painful joint, the muscles and tendons may shorten due to lack of use. This shortening can lead to difficulty straightening a joint which is called a contracture. The bone in the affected area may grow either too quickly or too slowly, so the child may have one limb that is shorter than the other. This problem is most noticeable in children with arthritis in one knee or ankle and not the other leg (asymmetrical arthritis). Other symptoms include redness and warmth around the affected joint, low fever, loss of appetite, weight loss, and fatigue. Joint symptoms of arthritis may include stiffness, pain, redness and warmth of the joint, and swelling. Bone in the area of an affected joint may grow too quickly, or too slowly, resulting in limbs which are of different lengths. When the child tries to avoid moving a painful joint, the muscle may begin to shorten from disuse. This is called a contracture.

Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is classified into different subtypes depending upon the symptoms that appear within the first six months that the child develops the disorder.

Pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: This is the most common and the least severe type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, affecting about 40-60% of all juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients. This type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis affects fewer than four joints, usually the knee, ankle, wrist, and/or elbow. Other more general (systemic) symptoms are usually absent, and the child's growth usually remains normal. Very few children (less than 15%) with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis end up with deformed joints. Some children with this form of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis experience painless swelling of the joint. Some children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have a serious inflammation of structures within the eye, which if left undiagnosed and untreated could even lead to blindness. While many children have cycles of flares and remissions, in some children the disease completely and permanently resolves within a few years of diagnosis.

Polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: About 40% of all cases of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are of this type. More girls than boys are diagnosed with this form of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. This type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is most common in children up to age three, or after the age of 10. Polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis affects five or more joints simultaneously. This type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis usually affects the small joints of both hands and both feet, although other large joints may be affected as well. Some patients with arthritis in their knees will experience a different rate of growth in each leg. Ultimately, one leg will grow longer than the other. About half of all patients with polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have arthritis of the spine and/or hip. Some patients with polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis will have other symptoms of a systemic illness, including anemia (low red blood cell count), decreased growth rate, low appetite, low-grade fever, and a slight rash. The disease is most severe in those children who are diagnosed in early adolescence. Some of these children will test positive for a marker present in other autoimmune disorders, called rheumatoid factor (RF). RF is found in adults who have rheumatoid arthritis. Children who are positive for RF tend to have a more severe course, with a disabling form of arthritis which destroys and deforms the joints. This type of arthritis is thought to be the adult form of rheumatoid arthritis occurring at a very early age.

Systemic onset juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: Sometimes called Still disease (after a physician who originally described it), this type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis occurs in about 10-20% off all patients with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Symptoms begin with a high fever that usually peaks in the evening; a flat, pale pink rash on the trunk and upper arms or legs; appetite and weight loss; and enlarged lymph nodes, spleen, and liver. The last symptoms to appear may be joint and muscle pain, often around the legs and ankles. The child may also become severely anemic. Other complications can include inflammation of the sac containing the heart or the heart itself (pericarditis; myocarditis); or inflammation of the tissue lining the chest cavity and lungs (pleuritis). Spondyloarthropathy is a type of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis that is more common in boys over the age of 8 years. It usually first affects the lower extremity joints and/or adjacent tendon attachment the it may later involve the lower spine. The eyes may also become inflamed at which time they are usually red and sore; chronic eye damage is not common. Children with a skin condition called psoriasis may develop a form of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Psoriatic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may appear similar to pauci or polyarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Children with psoriatic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may have a family history of psoriasis. They will eventually have the rash, and early indications may include pits or ridges in their fingernails.

Besides joint symptoms, children with systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis have a high fever and a light skin rash. The rash and fever may appear and disappear very quickly. Systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis also may cause the lymph nodes located in the neck and other parts of the body to swell. In some cases (less than half), internal organs including the heart and, very rarely, the lungs may be involved. Eye inflammation is a potentially severe complication that sometimes occurs in children with pauciarticular juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Typically, there are periods when the symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis are better or disappear (called remissions) and times when symptoms are worse (flare-ups). Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is different in each child - some might have just one or two flare-ups and never have symptoms again, while others experience many flare-ups or even have symptoms that never go away. Some children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may have growth problems. Depending on the severity of the disease and the joints involved, growth in affected joints may be too fast or too slow, causing one leg or arm to be longer than the other. Overall growth may also be slowed. Doctors are exploring the use of growth hormones to treat this problem. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis also may cause joints to grow unevenly or to one side.

More information on rheumatoid arthritis and other arthritis conditions (osteoarthritis, septic arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, Reiter's syndrome, ankylosing spondylitis, gout)

What is rheumatoid arthritis? - Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune disorder that marked by stiffness and inflammation of the joints, weakness, loss of mobility, and deformity.
What causes rheumatoid arthritis? - The cause of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is unknown. Rheumatoid arthritis involves an attack on the body by its own immune cells (auto-immune disease).
What're the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis? - The symptoms that distinguish rheumatoid arthritis are inflammation and soft-tissue swelling of many joints at the same time (polyarthritis).
How is rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed? - Health professionals diagnose rheumatoid arthritis by examining joints and evaluating ymptoms, medical history, and results of several tests.
What's the treatment for rheumatoid arthritis? - The treatment of rheumatoid arthritis includes the use of non-drug treatment such as rest and physiotherapy, drugs may be required both to control symptoms of the disease.
What rheumatoid arthritis medications are available? - Rheumatoid arthritis medications include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, injectable gold salts, plaquenil or hydroxychloroquine.
What rheumatoid arthritis diet is suggested? - Certain vitamin supplements may be beneficial. Many herbs also are useful in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
What is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? - Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) is a form of arthritis in children ages 16 or younger that causes inflammation and stiffness of joints for more than six weeks.
What causes juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? - Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disorder. Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is considered to be a multifactorial condition.
What're the symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? - Symptoms of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis may appear during episodes (flare-ups) or may be chronic and continuous.
How is juvenile rheumatoid arthritis diagnosed? - Diagnosis of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis is often made on the basis of the child's collection of symptoms.
What're the treatments for juvenile rheumatoid arthritis? - The treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis centers on decreasing joint inflammation, suppressing pain, and preserving movement.
What is osteoarthritis? - Osteoarthritis (OA), also known as arthrosis or degenerative joint disease, is a disease featuring pain and impaired function of the joints.
What causes osteoarthritis? - Primary osteoarthritis is mostly related to aging. Osteoarthritis results from a combination of genetic predisposition and joint injuries.
What're the risk factors for osteoarthritis? - Risk factors for osteoarthritis are congenital hip luxation, obesity, osteoporosis, and inflammatory diseases.
What're the complications of osteoarthritis? - The major complication of osteoarthritis is pain. The degree of pain can vary greatly. Osteoarthritis itself is not life threatening.
What are symptoms of osteoarthritis? - The main symptoms of osteoarthritis are is pain that worsens during activity and that gets better during rest.
How is osteoarthritis diagnosed? - The doctor makes the diagnosis of osteoarthritis based on the characteristic symptoms, physical examination, and the x-ray appearance of joints.
What's the treatment for osteoarthritis? - Osteoarthritis is treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Severe pain in specific joints can be treated with local injections with lidocaine.
What're the medications for osteoarthritis? - Acetaminophen is used for mild to moderate osteoarthritis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or COX-2 medications for moderate to severe arthritic pain.
What nutritional supplements cure osteoarthritis? - A combination of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate is used as a dietary supplement to cure osteoarthritis. Vitamin D and calcium are recommended for strong bones.
Treatments for osteoarthritis pain relief - OTC pain relievers like acetaminophen (Tylenol) and aspirin are familiar choices for the treatment of osteoarthritis pain relief.
What osteoarthritis exercise is suggested? - Regular exercise is very important for successful control of osteoarthritis. Exercise helps patients ostearthritis in the hip or in the knee.
Can osteoarthritis be prevented? - Obese people are at risk of osteoarthritis and that weight loss can help prevent or delay osteoarthritis from occurring.
What is osteoarthritis of the hip? - Osteoarthritis of the hip can cause insidious pain in the groin or inguinal region and, on occasion, pain in the side of the buttock or upper thigh.
What is arthritis? - Arthritis is a group of conditions that affect the health of the bone joints in the body. Arthritis is painful inflammation of a joint or joints of the body.
What types of arthritis are there? - Types of arthritis include osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, gout, infectious arthritis, fibromyalgia, lupus.
What causes arthritis? - The causes of arthritis depend on the form of arthritis. The cause of arthritis may be an infection, injury, abnormality of the immune system, aging.
What're the risk factors for arthritis? - Risk factors for arthritis include age, gender, obesity, injury, ethnicity. The risk of developing arthritis increases with age.
What're the signs and symptoms of arthritis? - Different types of arthritis have different symptoms. Other arthritis symptoms include fatigue, fever, a rash and the signs of joint inflammation.
How is arthritis diagnosed? - The diagnosis of arthritis is based on the pattern of symptoms, medical history, family history, physical examination, X-rays and lab tests.
What's the treatment for arthritis? - The objectives in the treatment of arthritis are controlling inflammation, preserving joint function, and curing the disease if that is possible.
Therapies for arthritis pain relief - Short-term relief for arthritis pain and inflammation may include pain relievers. NSAIDs are used to reduce pain and inflammation.
What natural therapies are available to cure arthritis? - Natural therapies for arthritis pain relief include glucosamine, chondroitin sulfates, nettle leaf, S-adenosylmethionine, and exrutine.
What can be done to prevent arthritis? - Consumption of green tea may prevent arthritis damage and benefit the arthritis patient by reducing inflammation and slowing cartilage breakdown.
What is the Arthritis Foundation? - The Arthritis Foundation is the only nationwide, nonprofit health organization helping take greater control of arthritis in the United States.
What is septic arthritis (infectious arthritis)? - Septic arthritis, also known as infectious arthritis or pyogenic arthritis, is an infection in the joint (synovial) fluid and joint tissues.
What causes septic arthritis? - Septic arthritis develops when bacteria spread from a source of infection through the bloodstream to a joint or the joint is directly infected by traumatic penetration.
What're the symptoms of septic arthritis? - The symptoms of septic arthritis (infectious arthritis) include swelling in the infected joint and pain when the joint is moved.
How is septic arthritis diagnosed? - The diagnosis of infectious arthritis depends on a combination of laboratory testing with careful history-taking and physical examination of the affected joint.
What is the treatment for septic arthritis? - The goal of treatment for septic arthritis is to eliminate the infection with antibiotic therapy. Septic arthritis requires immediate treatment.
What is psoriatic arthritis? - Psoriatic arthritis is a chronic inflammation of the joints that occurs in some people with a chronic skin and nail condition known as psoriasis.
What causes psoriatic arthritis? - The cause of psoriatic arthritis is unknown. Psoriatic is triggered by an attack of the body's own immune system on itself.
What're the symptoms of psoriatic arthritis? - Symptoms of psoriatic arthritis include dry, scaly, silver patches of skin combined with joint pain and destructive changes in the feet, hands, knees, and spine
How is psoriatic arthritis diagnosed? - The diagnosis of psoriatic arthritis is made by identifying the typical symptoms of arthritis in a person with psoriasis.
What's the treatment for psoriatic arthritis? - Treatment of psoriatic arthritis focuses on controlling the skin rash and relieving joint inflammation.
What is Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)? - Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis) is a group of symptoms consisting of arthritis, urethritis, conjunctivitis, and lesions of the skin.
What causes Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)? - Reiter's syndrome appears to be a reaction to an infection that begins in an area of the body other than the joints.
What're the symptoms of Reiter's syndrome? - The symptoms of of Reiter's syndrome appear within days or weeks of infection followed by a low-grade fever, conjunctivitis.
How is Reiter's syndrome diagnosed? - Diagnosis of Reiter's syndrome is often difficult because there is no specific test to confirm that a person has reactive arthritis.
What's the treatment for Reiter's syndrome? - The objective of treatment for Reiter's syndrome is to alleviate the symptoms associated with the syndrome and to treat any underlying infection.
What is ankylosing spondylitis? - Ankylosing spondylitis is a chronic inflammatory disease that affects the joints between the vertebrae of the spine, and the joints between the spine and the pelvis.
What causes ankylosing spondylitis? - The specific cause of ankylosing spondylitis is unknown, but the disease tends to run in families, indicating that genetics plays a role.
What're the symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis? - Symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis include back pain, loss of appetite, weight loss, fatigue, and anemia.
How is ankylosing spondylitis diagnosed? - Doctors usually diagnose ankylosing spondylitis simply by the patient's report of pain and stiffness.
What's the treatment for ankylosing spondylitis? - Physical therapy for ankylosing spondylitis can provide a number of benefits, from pain relief to improved physical strength and flexibility.
What is gout (gouty arthritis)? - Gout or gouty arthritis is a form of arthritis caused by the accumulation of uric acid crystals (due to hyperuricemia) in joints.
What causes gout (gouty arthritis)? - Gout is caused by a defect in metabolism which results in an overproduction of uric acid or leads to reduced ability of the kidney to eliminate uric acid.
What are the risk factors for gout? - Risk factors for gout (gouty arthritis) include genetics, age, gender, alcohol use, obesity, medications, and medical conditions.
What're the complications of gout? - Gout often accompanies heart problems, including high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, and congestive heart failure.
What are the symptoms of gout (gouty arthritis)? - An attack of chronic gout is similar to an attack of acute gouty arthritis. The affected joints show signs of warmth, redness, and tenderness.
How is gout diagnosed? - The diagnosis of gout is generally made on a clinical basis. Physicians can diagnose gout based on the physical examination and medical history.
What's the treatment for gout (gouty arthritis)? - The goals of treatment for gout consist of alleviating pain, avoiding severe attacks in the future, and preventing long-term joint damage.
What gout medications are available? - Gout medications include nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, colchicine, corticosteroids, xanthine oxidase inhibitors, uricosuric agents.
What gout diet is suggested? - The principle of a gout diet is to reduce purines or lower uric acid when we take food. Avoid foods high in purines. Alcohol should be avoided.
How to prevent gout (gouty arthritis)? - Prevention is the best defense against gout (gouty arthritis). Losing weight and limiting alcohol intake can help ward off gout.
Bone, joint, & muscle disorders

Natural arthritis formula
Arthrit-Eze is the most advanced formula on the market today. It offers potential relief and rejuvenation for all forms of arthritis, safely, naturally and without side effects.

Topics in bone, joint, and muscle disorders

Bone diseases
Bone tumors
Bone cancer
Muscle diseases
Spine (neck and back) disorders
Dupuytren's contracture
Costochondritis
Bunions
Plantar fasciitis
Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
Septic arthritis (infectious Arthritis)
Psoriatic arthritis
Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)
Ankylosing spondylitis
Gout (gouty arthritis)
Tendinitis
Osteoporosis
Whiplash
Fibromyalgia


All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005