health care  
 
All about fibromyalgia syndrome causes of fibromyalgia risk factors for fibromyalgia complications of fibromyalgia symptoms of fibromyalgia diagnosis of fibromyalgia fibromyalgia treatments fibromyalgia diet fibromyalgia exercise fibromyalgia pain relief medications

What fibromyalgia exercise is suggested?

Low-impact aerobic exercises, such as swimming, cycling, walking and stationary cross-country ski machines can be effective treatments for fibromyalgia. Exercise regimens are most beneficial when performed on an every-other-day basis, in the morning. How exercise benefits fibromyalgia is unknown. Exercise may exert its beneficial effect by promoting a deep

level of sleep (non-REM sleep). Similarly, avoiding alcohol and caffeine before bedtime can also help promote a more restful sleep. Strength training and regular low-impact aerobic exercise is very helpful for raising the pain threshold, although it may take months to perceive benefits. Desirable exercises are walking, swimming, and using stationary bikes. Swimming and water therapy, which eliminate weight-bearing, appear to be excellent choices for getting started.

A very gradual incremental program of activity, beginning with mild exercise and building over time, is important to help patients comply with exercise. Patients who attempt strenuous exercise too early actually experience an increase in pain and are likely to become discouraged and quit. It should be noted that even walking two or three times a week is helpful. Every patient must be prepared for relapses and setbacks, which are nearly universal, but this should not dissuade the patient from exercising. Patients who do not respond to one type of exercise might consider experimenting with other forms of physical activity. It should be noted that some patients are so disabled that they experience no benefits over time and some feel even worse even after many attempts and different programs. Such patients should not be discouraged. Other treatments are available that can be very helpful, including medications and cognitive behavioral therapy.

More information on fibromyalgia syndrome

What is fibromyalgia syndrome? - Fibromyalgia is a debilitating chronic illness characterized by diffuse pain, fatigue, and a wide range of other symptoms.
What causes fibromyalgia? - The cause of fibromyalgia is currently unknown. Sleep disturbances are common in fibromyalgia. Fibromyalgia is an inherited disorder.
What're the risk factors for fibromyalgia? - Risk factors for fibromyalgia include gender, age, genetic factors, specific lifestyle factors, psychiatric illness.
What're the complications of fibromyalgia? - Fibromyalgia is a common and chronic problem. Fibromyalgia can be mild or disabling, and the emotional repercussions can be substantial.
What are the symptoms of fibromyalgia? - Fibromyalgia symptoms include widespread, diffuse pain, physical fatigue, irritable bowel syndrome, genitourinary symptoms, dermatological disorders.
How is fibromyalgia diagnosed? - Diagnosis of fibromyalgia is difficult. The doctor may make a diagnosis by ruling out other conditions with similar symptoms.
What's the treatment for fibromyalgia? - There is no cure for fibromyalgia. Treatment for fibromyalgia involves conventional analgesics to reduce the effects of fatigue and pain.
What fibromyalgia diet is suggested? - Fibromyalgia patients should maintain a healthy diet low in animal fat and high in fiber, with plenty of whole grains, fresh fruits and vegetables.
What fibromyalgia exercise is suggested? - Low-impact aerobic exercises are effective treatments for fibromyalgia. Exercise regimens are most beneficial when performed on an every-other-day basis.
Fibromyalgia pain relief medications - Pain relief is of major concern for patients with fibromyalgia. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) is often used for mild pibromyalgia pain relief.
Bone, joint, & muscle disorders

Topics in bone, joint, and muscle disorders

Bone diseases
Bone tumors
Bone cancer
Muscle diseases
Spine (neck and back) disorders
Dupuytren's contracture
Costochondritis
Bunions
Plantar fasciitis
Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
Septic arthritis (infectious Arthritis)
Psoriatic arthritis
Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)
Ankylosing spondylitis
Gout (gouty arthritis)
Tendinitis
Osteoporosis
Whiplash
Fibromyalgia


All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005