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All about Dupuytren's contracture causes of Dupuytren's contracture symptoms of Dupuytren's contracture diagnosis of Dupuytren's contracture treatment for Dupuytren's contracture

What is Dupuytren's contracture?

Dupuytren's contracture is a painless thickening and contracture of tissue beneath the skin on the palm of the hand and fingers. Progressive contracture may result in deformity and loss of function of the hand. Dupuytren's contracture, also called

Dupuytren's disease, usually begins with a thickening of the skin in the palm of the hand, which may develop into a hard lump or thick band that eventually could cause the fingers to contract, or pull into the palm. The fibrous tissues beneath the skin in the palm of the hand become thickened. Over many years this thickened tissue begins to contract. This pulls the fingers which are gradually pulled into a permanent flexed position. This means that the affected fingers cannot be straightened fully. The little and ring fingers are usually the worst affected. It is usually not painful. The main problem is that you cannot use the affected fingers properly. The extent of the contracture varies greatly from mild to severe. Sometimes just one hand is affected, and sometimes it affects both hands. Dupuytren's Contracture is a benign or non-cancerous condition, which affects the palm of the hand and fingers. Dupuytren's Contracture typically begins as a thickening of the tissue of the palm in the form of a nodule or lump. It is almost always painless and usually affects the ring or small finger. As the contracture progresses, the abnormal tissue begins to tighten and will bend the affected fingers into the palm. This is usually a very gradual process. Bending the fingers is not a problem, but straightening them may be difficult or impossible if the disease is advanced or severe. In severe cases, the contracture may interfere with activities of daily living such as wearing gloves, washing hands and putting hands in pockets.

More information on Dupuytren's contracture

What is Dupuytren's contracture? - Dupuytren's contracture is a painless thickening and contracture of tissue beneath the skin on the palm of the hand and fingers.
What causes Dupuytren's contracture? - Dupuytren's contracture may be associated with cigarette smoking, epilepsy, diabetes, and alcoholism, and usually presents in middle age.
What're the symptoms of Dupuytren's contracture? - Dupuytren's Contracture typically begins as a thickening of the tissue of the palm in the form of a nodule or lump.
How is Dupuytren's contracture diagnosed? - A physical examination of the palm by touch (palpation) confirms the presence of thickened scar tissue (fibrosis) and contracture.
What's the treatment for Dupuytren's contracture? - Exercises, warm water baths, or splints may be helpful. The surgical treatment consists of removal of the diseased tissue, followed by significant hand therapy.
Bone, joint, & muscle disorders

Topics in bone, joint, and muscle disorders

Bone diseases
Bone tumors
Bone cancer
Muscle diseases
Spine (neck and back) disorders
Dupuytren's contracture
Costochondritis
Bunions
Plantar fasciitis
Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
Septic arthritis (infectious Arthritis)
Psoriatic arthritis
Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)
Ankylosing spondylitis
Gout (gouty arthritis)
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Osteoporosis
Whiplash
Fibromyalgia


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