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All about Dupuytren's contracture causes of Dupuytren's contracture symptoms of Dupuytren's contracture diagnosis of Dupuytren's contracture treatment for Dupuytren's contracture

What're the symptoms of Dupuytren's contracture?

Dupuytren's Contracture typically begins as a thickening of the tissue of the palm in the form of a nodule or lump. Firm nodules or cords may be noticed beneath the skin of the palm or fingers. This is followed by progressive bending of the fingers. This condition is not painful, except in the beginning when there may be sensitivity to pressure. As the contracture progresses, the abnormal tissue begins to tighten and will bend the affected fingers into the palm. This is usually a very gradual process. In mild cases no treatment is needed. In many cases the condition remains mild and causes little interference with use of the hand. Treatment is needed only if the normal function of the hand is affected. The only long-term cure to release the fingers is an operation. If the function of the hand is affected, and the contracture is 30 degrees or more, then a surgeon may recommend an operation to cut out or divide the thickened tissue. This then enables the fingers to straighten again.

More information on Dupuytren's contracture

What is Dupuytren's contracture? - Dupuytren's contracture is a painless thickening and contracture of tissue beneath the skin on the palm of the hand and fingers.
What causes Dupuytren's contracture? - Dupuytren's contracture may be associated with cigarette smoking, epilepsy, diabetes, and alcoholism, and usually presents in middle age.
What're the symptoms of Dupuytren's contracture? - Dupuytren's Contracture typically begins as a thickening of the tissue of the palm in the form of a nodule or lump.
How is Dupuytren's contracture diagnosed? - A physical examination of the palm by touch (palpation) confirms the presence of thickened scar tissue (fibrosis) and contracture.
What's the treatment for Dupuytren's contracture? - Exercises, warm water baths, or splints may be helpful. The surgical treatment consists of removal of the diseased tissue, followed by significant hand therapy.
Bone, joint, & muscle disorders

Topics in bone, joint, and muscle disorders

Bone diseases
Bone tumors
Bone cancer
Muscle diseases
Spine (neck and back) disorders
Dupuytren's contracture
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Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
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Septic arthritis (infectious Arthritis)
Psoriatic arthritis
Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)
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All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005