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All about bunions causes of bunions symptoms of bunion diagnosis of bunions bunion treatment bunion removal surgery

What are bunions?

A bunion is the painful swelling of the fluid-filled sac, called the bursa, at the first joint of the big toe. A bunion occurs because of a condition called hallux valgus, a bone displacement in which the big toe bulges out at the base and the top of the toe points in toward the second toe. Hallux is another term for the big toe. The joint at the base of the big toe is made up of two bones. One extends from the arch of the foot and the other connects to the big toe. The two bones meet in a joint near

the "ball" of the foot. In some persons, the bone from the arch tends to turn outward and the toe bone tends to turn inward, toward the second toe. This may be caused by a family tendency, unstable arches, or wearing ill-fitting shoes. Continued irritation of the bunion by friction with the shoe leads to increased bone growth and further swelling of the bursa, enlarging the bunion and further widening the foot. The joint contains a small sac (bursa) filled with fluid that cushions the bones and helps the joint to move smoothly. When a bunion forms, this sac becomes inflamed and thickened. The swelling in the joint causes additional pain and pressure in the toe.

A bunion, which is most often blamed on tight, narrow shoes, can become progressively larger, to the point where wearing any type of shoe is painful. Bursitis, an inflammation of the small sac between a tendon and a bone, may set in and your child's big toe may begin to angle toward the second toe, or move all the way under it. The pressure from the big toe could force the second toe out of alignment, sometimes overlapping the third toe. Bunions are often caused by narrow-toed, high-heeled shoes. These compress the big toe and push it toward the second toe. The condition may become painful as extra bone and a fluid-filled sac grow at the base of the big toe. This leads to swelling and pain. Bunions occur more frequently in women and sometimes run in families. Bunions are more likely to occur in women who wear high heels with narrow, pointed toes; people who wear poorly fitting shoes; and people with flat feet. Some people also tend to put more stress than normal on the inside of the foot when they run or walk, making them more prone to bunions. The tendency toward bunions appears to run in families.

More information on bunion

What are bunions? - A bunion is the painful swelling of the fluid-filled sac, called the bursa, at the first joint of the big toe. Bunions are often caused by narrow-toed, high-heeled shoes.
What causes bunions? - Bunions are often caused by narrow-toed, high-heeled shoes. These compress the big toe and push it toward the second toe.
What're the symptoms of a bunion? - Symptoms of bunions include the common signs of inflammation such as redness, swelling, and pain. Other symptoms include swelling, soreness and redness around the big toe joint.
How are bunions diagnosed? - Bunions and hallux valgus are diagnosed by examination. An evaluation should be performed by a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon.
What's the treatment for bunions? - Treatment for bunions are based on the severity of the deformity and symptoms. Surgical removal of a bunion is usually done.
What's bunion removal surgery? - The goal of the bunion removal surgery is to correct the cause of the bunion and to prevent the bunion from growing back.
Bone, joint, & muscle disorders

Topics in bone, joint, and muscle disorders

Bone diseases
Bone tumors
Bone cancer
Muscle diseases
Spine (neck and back) disorders
Dupuytren's contracture
Costochondritis
Bunions
Plantar fasciitis
Arthritis
Osteoarthritis
Rheumatoid arthritis
Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis
Septic arthritis (infectious Arthritis)
Psoriatic arthritis
Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)
Ankylosing spondylitis
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