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All about bunions causes of bunions symptoms of bunion diagnosis of bunions bunion treatment bunion removal surgery

What's the treatment for bunions?

Treatment options are based on the severity of the deformity and symptoms. The initial treatment for a bunion is changing from narrow and/or high-heeled shoes to wide shoes without a heel. When this does not work, surgery may be recommended. The first step in treating a bunion is to remove as much pressure from the area as possible. Your doctor

may tell you to start wearing roomy, comfortable shoes with toe-pad inserts or with a special corrective device that slips into your shoes to push the big toe back into its proper position. Acetaminophen (Tylenol) or an anti-inflammatory medication, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin and others), can help to relieve pain. Whirlpool baths also may help to ease discomfort.

People with bunions should wear shoes that have enough room in the toe box to accommodate the bunion and avoid high-heeled shoes and tight-fitting socks or stockings. Dressings and pads help protect the bunion from additional shoe pressure. The application of splints or customized shoe inserts (orthotics) to correct the alignment of the big toe joint is effective for many bunions. Most patients are instructed to rest or choose exercises that put less stress on their feet, at least until the misalignment is corrected. In some cases, physicians also use steroid injections with local anesthetic around the bunion to reduce inflammation.

Surgical removal of a bunion is usually done while the patient is under general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free) and rarely requires a hospital stay. An incision is made along the bones of the big toe into the foot. The deformed joint and bones are repaired, and the bones are stabilized with a pin and/or cast. The goal of the surgery is to correct the cause of the bunion and to prevent the bunion from growing back. After surgery, pain medication will be prescribed, and you will be told when you can start moving your toes and ankle.

More information on bunion

What are bunions? - A bunion is the painful swelling of the fluid-filled sac, called the bursa, at the first joint of the big toe. Bunions are often caused by narrow-toed, high-heeled shoes.
What causes bunions? - Bunions are often caused by narrow-toed, high-heeled shoes. These compress the big toe and push it toward the second toe.
What're the symptoms of a bunion? - Symptoms of bunions include the common signs of inflammation such as redness, swelling, and pain. Other symptoms include swelling, soreness and redness around the big toe joint.
How are bunions diagnosed? - Bunions and hallux valgus are diagnosed by examination. An evaluation should be performed by a pediatric orthopaedic surgeon.
What's the treatment for bunions? - Treatment for bunions are based on the severity of the deformity and symptoms. Surgical removal of a bunion is usually done.
What's bunion removal surgery? - The goal of the bunion removal surgery is to correct the cause of the bunion and to prevent the bunion from growing back.
Bone, joint, & muscle disorders

Topics in bone, joint, and muscle disorders

Bone diseases
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Bone cancer
Muscle diseases
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Dupuytren's contracture
Costochondritis
Bunions
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Rheumatoid arthritis
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Septic arthritis (infectious Arthritis)
Psoriatic arthritis
Reiter's syndrome (reactive arthritis)
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All information is intended for reference only. Please consult your physician for accurate medical advices and treatment. Copyright 2005, health-cares.net, all rights reserved. Last update: July 18, 2005